Please use the arrows above to view the Art @ Offsite Collection

Art @ Offsite is a program made up of two different initiatives. The first is Artists in Residence, made up of 19 artists who have loaned their work for a period of twelve to twenty-four months. All of the Artists in Residence are either from Philadelphia, currently live locally, or have strong ties to the city. Many are teachers at Philadelphia’s finest art schools including The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, The Tyler School of Art and Architecture at Temple University, and The University of the Arts.

The second initiative, Spotlight, is in partnership with Philadelphia Contemporary. PC is a non-profit contemporary art institution curating pop-up programming around the city with plans to build a permanent home in a new, community-based art space in West Philadelphia.  Philadelphia Contemporary will curate two special exhibitions each year, highlighting the breadth of the unique artist’s work.

On the first Thursday evening of each month, Offsite will host a public tour to showcase Art @ Offsite.

“I believe art can inspire creativity, provoke thoughtful discourse, and connect people. Art can elevate all aspects of everyday life, and we are proud to share a beautiful and diverse selection of works with the Offsite community.”  – Michael Forman, FS Investments’ founder and Fitler Club co-founder

Jill Bonovitz, (b. 1940 Philadelphia)
Untitled, 2019.
Wire, dried berries and paint.

In her wire works, Jill Bonovitz creates the edges of what is not there. She is guided by intuition and engagement with the material, never certain of a work’s destination. Her work Untitled was made by manipulating different gauges and colors of wire. Bonovitz approaches her sculpture as though she is drawing in the air. After she is satisfied with the form, she applies acrylic paint in certain areas to guide the viewer’s eye around the sculpture. The materials used are simple, yet the resulting work is nuanced and deeply personal. Bonovitz studied at Moore College of Art & Design. In 1974, with four other Moore-affiliated artists, Bonovitz cofounded The Clay Studio. Initially established as a stepping-stone for students fresh out of art school, offering affordable studio space and shared equipment, The Clay Studio is now a nonprofit where artists from across the country and around the world cultivate their careers.

Anthony Campuzano, (b. 1975 Philadelphia)
AM/PM, 2010.
Colored pencil, graphite, ink, photographs on board.

Anthony Campuzano is known for his use of found language in his drawings, taking text from such sources as newspaper headlines, Wikipedia entries, the covers of paperback novels, and song lyrics. He distills this language into succinct phrases that express a particular mood or capture the essence of an important headline. His work has been exhibited widely including solo exhibitions at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Fleisher/Ollman Gallery, Philadelphia; and White Columns, New York. Campuzano received his BFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia, and is a 2009 recipient of the Pew Fellowship in the Arts. Campuzano is represented by Fleisher Ollman Gallery.

Anthony Campuzano, (b. 1975 Philadelphia)
Portrait of Mae Brussell, 2005.
Colored pencil and graphite on illustration board.

Anthony Campuzano is known for his use of found language in his drawings, taking text from such sources as newspaper headlines, Wikipedia entries, the covers of paperback novels, and song lyrics. He distills this language into succinct phrases that express a particular mood or capture the essence of an important headline. His work has been exhibited widely including solo exhibitions at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Fleisher/Ollman Gallery, Philadelphia; and White Columns, New York. Campuzano received his BFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia, and is a 2009 recipient of the Pew Fellowship in the Arts. Campuzano is represented by Fleisher Ollman Gallery.

Sarah Gamble, (b. 1974 North Carolina)
Untitled, 2019.
Acrylic and spray paint on paper mounted on panel.

Sarah Gamble’s work synthesizes representation and abstraction in paintings where energy is made visible and characters—some vaguely human, others more animal—co-exist in unsettling environments. Gamble’s evocative style, the ease with which she works the paint, and her willingness to experiment with media, foster the creation of un-knowable spaces, and otherworldly moods.
Gamble was awarded a Pew Fellowship in the Arts in 2009, and completed a yearlong residency at the Roswell Artist-in-Residence Program, New Mexico in 2014. She received her MFA from the University of Pennsylvania and her BFA from the Corcoran Gallery College of Art and Design, Washington, DC. Gamble is represented by Fleisher Ollman Gallery.

Sarah Gamble, (b. 1974 North Carolina)
Untitled, 2017.
Acrylic on paper mounted on panel.

Sarah Gamble’s work synthesizes representation and abstraction in paintings where energy is made visible and characters—some vaguely human, others more animal—co-exist in unsettling environments. Gamble’s evocative style, the ease with which she works the paint, and her willingness to experiment with media, foster the creation of un-knowable spaces, and otherworldly moods.
Gamble was awarded a Pew Fellowship in the Arts in 2009, and completed a yearlong residency at the Roswell Artist-in-Residence Program, New Mexico in 2014. She received her MFA from the University of Pennsylvania and her BFA from the Corcoran Gallery College of Art and Design, Washington, DC. Gamble is represented by Fleisher Ollman Gallery.

David Graham, (b. 1952 Abington, PA)
(left) Gardening Friends, Point Breeze, Philadelphia, PA, 1988.
Chromogenic color print.

(right) National Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame, Hayward, WI, 1984.
Chromogenic color print.

David Graham is an internationally recognized photographer, whose subject is the American cultural landscape. He brings compassion and humor to his work, capturing the colorful, sometimes surreal, and often bizarre people and symbols that express the unique character of American life.

Graham received a BFA from The University of the Arts in Philadelphia and his MFA in Photography from the Tyler School of Art. He has taught at Moore Collee of Art and is currently a Professor of Photography at The University of the Arts.

Graham has published ten books and his works has appeared in The New York Times, Harper’s, The New Yorker and The Philadelphia Inquirer, among others. He has had numerous solo exhibitions including at the International Center of Photography in New York, the Institute for Contemporary Art in Philadelphia, and the Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art, and his work is in many museum collections including Princeton University Art Museum, Museum of Modern Art in New York, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Art Institute of Chicago and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

David Graham, (b. 1952 Abington, PA)
(left) Waterworks, Philadelphia, PA, 1980.
Chromogenic color print.

(right) The Post Bulletins Practicing at Graham Park, Rochester, MN, 1988.
Chromogenic color print.

David Graham is an internationally recognized photographer, whose subject is the American cultural landscape. He brings compassion and humor to his work, capturing the colorful, sometimes surreal, and often bizarre people and symbols that express the unique character of American life.

Graham received a BFA from The University of the Arts in Philadelphia and his MFA in Photography from the Tyler School of Art. He has taught at Moore Collee of Art and is currently a Professor of Photography at The University of the Arts.

Graham has published ten books and his works has appeared in The New York Times, Harper’s, The New Yorker and The Philadelphia Inquirer, among others. He has had numerous solo exhibitions including at the International Center of Photography in New York, the Institute for Contemporary Art in Philadelphia, and the Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art, and his work is in many museum collections including Princeton University Art Museum, Museum of Modern Art in New York, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Art Institute of Chicago and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Neysa Grassi, (b. 1951 Havertown, PA)
Echo, 2008.
Oil on linen.

The translucent, textured surfaces of Neysa Grassi’s paintings evoke deep and primal imagery from humankind’s history. Resembling cave paintings or ancient decorations, her work features built-up surfaces of many layers, which the artist rubs, sands, and scrapes to reveal underlying images, or to create new ones. In her work, she addresses modern man’s intellectual limits, and describes her paintings as “moving toward a presentation of colors that have no names, that have not yet been named.” Her vaporous compositions have been likened to those of painters like Jules Olitski and Anish Kapoor. Grassi is a recipient of the Pew Fellowship in the Arts and a critic in the MFA program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She has had solo exhibitions at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts. Grassi is represented by Locks Gallery.

Neysa Grassi, (b. 1951 Havertown, PA)
Pink Storm, 2010.
Oil on linen.

The translucent, textured surfaces of Neysa Grassi’s paintings evoke deep and primal imagery from humankind’s history. Resembling cave paintings or ancient decorations, her work features built-up surfaces of many layers, which the artist rubs, sands, and scrapes to reveal underlying images, or to create new ones. In her work, she addresses modern man’s intellectual limits, and describes her paintings as “moving toward a presentation of colors that have no names, that have not yet been named.” Her vaporous compositions have been likened to those of painters like Jules Olitski and Anish Kapoor. Grassi is a recipient of the Pew Fellowship in the Arts and a critic in the MFA program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She has had solo exhibitions at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts. Grassi is represented by Locks Gallery.

Neysa Grassi, (b. 1951 Havertown, PA)
Underbelly, 2008.
Oil on linen.

The translucent, textured surfaces of Neysa Grassi’s paintings evoke deep and primal imagery from humankind’s history. Resembling cave paintings or ancient decorations, her work features built-up surfaces of many layers, which the artist rubs, sands, and scrapes to reveal underlying images, or to create new ones. In her work, she addresses modern man’s intellectual limits, and describes her paintings as “moving toward a presentation of colors that have no names, that have not yet been named.” Her vaporous compositions have been likened to those of painters like Jules Olitski and Anish Kapoor. Grassi is a recipient of the Pew Fellowship in the Arts and a critic in the MFA program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She has had solo exhibitions at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts. Grassi is represented by Locks Gallery.

Neysa Grassi, (b. 1951 Havertown, PA)
Untitled, 2003.
Monotype on paper. Hand colored.

The translucent, textured surfaces of Neysa Grassi’s paintings evoke deep and primal imagery from humankind’s history. Resembling cave paintings or ancient decorations, her work features built-up surfaces of many layers, which the artist rubs, sands, and scrapes to reveal underlying images, or to create new ones. In her work, she addresses modern man’s intellectual limits, and describes her paintings as “moving toward a presentation of colors that have no names, that have not yet been named.” Her vaporous compositions have been likened to those of painters like Jules Olitski and Anish Kapoor. Grassi is a recipient of the Pew Fellowship in the Arts and a critic in the MFA program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She has had solo exhibitions at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts. Grassi is represented by Locks Gallery.

Jane Irish, (b. 1955 Pittsfield, MA)
Antipodes Overdoor Sicily, 2017.
Distemper and oil on linen.

Jane Irish is an artist, painter, and ceramicist. Painting in egg tempera on large-scale canvas, paper and Tyvek, she infuses sumptuous interiors with reflections on colonialism and Orientalism. Sometimes her painting surfaces feature raised text; Vietnamese war poetry or historical protest writing. The text on the surface of her ceramics includes collaborations with prominent art critics like Vincent Katz and Carter Ratcliff and poetry from Vietnam war veterans. Irish’s inspiration comes from her own experience and personal connections. “I paint from the motifs for real. I meet the poets for real, the Vietnamese artists, the scholars, the French writers and colonialists. I am served by the butler of an Italian baroness and I am mentored by anti-war veterans. I somehow tap the tales told to me into my brushstrokes. Sometimes you just pick things up that you experience firsthand. I am a receptor, and I have collected these ideas on power and resistance, and when I see something that inspires it, it gets into my work.” Her work is included in numerous public collections including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and the Smithsonian’s Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden among others. Irish received her MFA from Queens College, CUNY and is represented by Locks Gallery.

Jane Irish, (b. 1955 Pittsfield, MA)
Pink and Blue Series of 4, 2014/5.
Egg tempera on canvas.

Jane Irish is an artist, painter, and ceramicist. Painting in egg tempera on large-scale canvas, paper and Tyvek, she infuses sumptuous interiors with reflections on colonialism and Orientalism. Sometimes her painting surfaces feature raised text; Vietnamese war poetry or historical protest writing. The text on the surface of her ceramics includes collaborations with prominent art critics like Vincent Katz and Carter Ratcliff and poetry from Vietnam war veterans. Irish’s inspiration comes from her own experience and personal connections. “I paint from the motifs for real. I meet the poets for real, the Vietnamese artists, the scholars, the French writers and colonialists. I am served by the butler of an Italian baroness and I am mentored by anti-war veterans. I somehow tap the tales told to me into my brushstrokes. Sometimes you just pick things up that you experience firsthand. I am a receptor, and I have collected these ideas on power and resistance, and when I see something that inspires it, it gets into my work.” Her work is included in numerous public collections including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and the Smithsonian’s Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden among others. Irish received her MFA from Queens College, CUNY and is represented by Locks Gallery.

Jane Irish, (b. 1955 Pittsfield, MA)
Pink and Blue Series of 4, 2014/5.
Egg tempera on canvas.

Jane Irish is an artist, painter, and ceramicist. Painting in egg tempera on large-scale canvas, paper and Tyvek, she infuses sumptuous interiors with reflections on colonialism and Orientalism. Sometimes her painting surfaces feature raised text; Vietnamese war poetry or historical protest writing. The text on the surface of her ceramics includes collaborations with prominent art critics like Vincent Katz and Carter Ratcliff and poetry from Vietnam war veterans. Irish’s inspiration comes from her own experience and personal connections. “I paint from the motifs for real. I meet the poets for real, the Vietnamese artists, the scholars, the French writers and colonialists. I am served by the butler of an Italian baroness and I am mentored by anti-war veterans. I somehow tap the tales told to me into my brushstrokes. Sometimes you just pick things up that you experience firsthand. I am a receptor, and I have collected these ideas on power and resistance, and when I see something that inspires it, it gets into my work.” Her work is included in numerous public collections including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and the Smithsonian’s Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden among others. Irish received her MFA from Queens College, CUNY and is represented by Locks Gallery.

Jane Irish, (b. 1955 Pittsfield, MA)
Save Waller Street / Yellow Room, 2007.
Oil on tyvec with raised letters, modeling paste, and archival foam.

Jane Irish is an artist, painter, and ceramicist. Painting in egg tempera on large-scale canvas, paper and Tyvek, she infuses sumptuous interiors with reflections on colonialism and Orientalism. Sometimes her painting surfaces feature raised text; Vietnamese war poetry or historical protest writing. The text on the surface of her ceramics includes collaborations with prominent art critics like Vincent Katz and Carter Ratcliff and poetry from Vietnam war veterans. Irish’s inspiration comes from her own experience and personal connections. “I paint from the motifs for real. I meet the poets for real, the Vietnamese artists, the scholars, the French writers and colonialists. I am served by the butler of an Italian baroness and I am mentored by anti-war veterans. I somehow tap the tales told to me into my brushstrokes. Sometimes you just pick things up that you experience firsthand. I am a receptor, and I have collected these ideas on power and resistance, and when I see something that inspires it, it gets into my work.” Her work is included in numerous public collections including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and the Smithsonian’s Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden among others. Irish received her MFA from Queens College, CUNY and is represented by Locks Gallery.

Leroy Johnson, (b. 1937)
60th Street, 2017.
Mixed media, collage.

The elevated train line and supporting columns take the shape of a temple, housing the vibrant, busy, energetic marketplace of 60th and Market below. The scene encompasses Johnson’s ideals of always existing in the past and the future at the same time.

Leroy Johnson (b. 1937) has been making art about the urban landscape of Philadelphia for over 50 years, working in mediums ranging from painting to collage and assemblage sculpture. Chronicling the evolving landscape of Philadelphia, his paintings and architectural sculptures offer juxtapositions of social tensions, historical moments, and urban structures in conversation with the lives of African Americans in the city. This selection of recent paintings and sculptures highlights Johnson’s interest in Philadelphia street corners, the interwoven histories of generations, and the most pressing conditions facing contemporary black families, including inadequate access to medical treatment, police brutality and the response of the Black Lives Matter movement, and gentrification. What sets Johnson and his work apart is his unflinching depiction of the world outside our doors, bringing attention to the forces and lives that have continuously shaped the City of Brotherly Love.

Leroy Johnson is the inaugural artist to be selected by Philadelphia Contemporary for the Art at Offsite Philadelphia Spotlight program. Philadelphia Spotlight seeks to highlight local artists by presenting focused, curated selections of their recent work to audiences at Offsite. All works in this exhibition are available for purchase; inquiries can be made at the front desk.

Leroy Johnson, (b. 1937)
Cornbread, 2015.
Mixed media, collage.

Cornbread pays homage to the North Philadelphia graffiti artist Darryl McCray, better known by his tagging name “Cornbread”. By inserting his tag into this scene of the 60th and Market train station, Johnson blends Philadelphia’s past and present.

Leroy Johnson (b. 1937) has been making art about the urban landscape of Philadelphia for over 50 years, working in mediums ranging from painting to collage and assemblage sculpture. Chronicling the evolving landscape of Philadelphia, his paintings and architectural sculptures offer juxtapositions of social tensions, historical moments, and urban structures in conversation with the lives of African Americans in the city. This selection of recent paintings and sculptures highlights Johnson’s interest in Philadelphia street corners, the interwoven histories of generations, and the most pressing conditions facing contemporary black families, including inadequate access to medical treatment, police brutality and the response of the Black Lives Matter movement, and gentrification. What sets Johnson and his work apart is his unflinching depiction of the world outside our doors, bringing attention to the forces and lives that have continuously shaped the City of Brotherly Love.

Leroy Johnson is the inaugural artist to be selected by Philadelphia Contemporary for the Art at Offsite Philadelphia Spotlight program. Philadelphia Spotlight seeks to highlight local artists by presenting focused, curated selections of their recent work to audiences at Offsite. All works in this exhibition are available for purchase; inquiries can be made at the front desk.

Leroy Johnson, (b. 1937)
Doll House, 1989.
Mixed media and found objects.

This doll house was constructed to reflect the multitude of issues that women are faced with on a daily basis. The little girl seated in front of the doll house has not yet been confronted with the issues (such as housing, privatized health care, and educational inequities) that she’ll have to deal with when she grows up.

Leroy Johnson (b. 1937) has been making art about the urban landscape of Philadelphia for over 50 years, working in mediums ranging from painting to collage and assemblage sculpture. Chronicling the evolving landscape of Philadelphia, his paintings and architectural sculptures offer juxtapositions of social tensions, historical moments, and urban structures in conversation with the lives of African Americans in the city. This selection of recent paintings and sculptures highlights Johnson’s interest in Philadelphia street corners, the interwoven histories of generations, and the most pressing conditions facing contemporary black families, including inadequate access to medical treatment, police brutality and the response of the Black Lives Matter movement, and gentrification. What sets Johnson and his work apart is his unflinching depiction of the world outside our doors, bringing attention to the forces and lives that have continuously shaped the City of Brotherly Love.

Leroy Johnson is the inaugural artist to be selected by Philadelphia Contemporary for the Art at Offsite Philadelphia Spotlight program. Philadelphia Spotlight seeks to highlight local artists by presenting focused, curated selections of their recent work to audiences at Offsite. All works in this exhibition are available for purchase; inquiries can be made at the front desk.

Leroy Johnson, (b. 1937)
Frankford, 2012.
Mixed media, collage.

The positive and negative silhouettes, cut from a collection of street photography, allude to shadows of activity as people walk under the Frankford Avenue underpass after dark.

Leroy Johnson (b. 1937) has been making art about the urban landscape of Philadelphia for over 50 years, working in mediums ranging from painting to collage and assemblage sculpture. Chronicling the evolving landscape of Philadelphia, his paintings and architectural sculptures offer juxtapositions of social tensions, historical moments, and urban structures in conversation with the lives of African Americans in the city. This selection of recent paintings and sculptures highlights Johnson’s interest in Philadelphia street corners, the interwoven histories of generations, and the most pressing conditions facing contemporary black families, including inadequate access to medical treatment, police brutality and the response of the Black Lives Matter movement, and gentrification. What sets Johnson and his work apart is his unflinching depiction of the world outside our doors, bringing attention to the forces and lives that have continuously shaped the City of Brotherly Love.

Leroy Johnson is the inaugural artist to be selected by Philadelphia Contemporary for the Art at Offsite Philadelphia Spotlight program. Philadelphia Spotlight seeks to highlight local artists by presenting focused, curated selections of their recent work to audiences at Offsite. All works in this exhibition are available for purchase; inquiries can be made at the front desk.

Leroy Johnson, (b. 1937)
Home Life, 2015.
Mixed media, collage.

Consistently perplexed by his parent’s and grandparent’s disinterest in discussing their childhood, Johnson was compelled to create a piece that represented the fractioned lives of Black people in America. Home Life is a tribute to Black elders, hinting to all that they’ve seen and experienced, the many challenges they faced, and the racially destructive history that still resonates within generations today.

Leroy Johnson (b. 1937) has been making art about the urban landscape of Philadelphia for over 50 years, working in mediums ranging from painting to collage and assemblage sculpture. Chronicling the evolving landscape of Philadelphia, his paintings and architectural sculptures offer juxtapositions of social tensions, historical moments, and urban structures in conversation with the lives of African Americans in the city. This selection of recent paintings and sculptures highlights Johnson’s interest in Philadelphia street corners, the interwoven histories of generations, and the most pressing conditions facing contemporary black families, including inadequate access to medical treatment, police brutality and the response of the Black Lives Matter movement, and gentrification. What sets Johnson and his work apart is his unflinching depiction of the world outside our doors, bringing attention to the forces and lives that have continuously shaped the City of Brotherly Love.

Leroy Johnson is the inaugural artist to be selected by Philadelphia Contemporary for the Art at Offsite Philadelphia Spotlight program. Philadelphia Spotlight seeks to highlight local artists by presenting focused, curated selections of their recent work to audiences at Offsite. All works in this exhibition are available for purchase; inquiries can be made at the front desk.

Leroy Johnson, (b. 1937)
Rest in Peace, 1990.
Mixed media and found objects.

Throughout the streets of Philadelphia, memorials strewn with photographs, teddy bears and flowers can be seen all over. In response, people call for peace, and for crime and the selling of drugs to cease, but it unfortunately comes all too late when these lives in need of saving have already been lost.

Leroy Johnson (b. 1937) has been making art about the urban landscape of Philadelphia for over 50 years, working in mediums ranging from painting to collage and assemblage sculpture. Chronicling the evolving landscape of Philadelphia, his paintings and architectural sculptures offer juxtapositions of social tensions, historical moments, and urban structures in conversation with the lives of African Americans in the city. This selection of recent paintings and sculptures highlights Johnson’s interest in Philadelphia street corners, the interwoven histories of generations, and the most pressing conditions facing contemporary black families, including inadequate access to medical treatment, police brutality and the response of the Black Lives Matter movement, and gentrification. What sets Johnson and his work apart is his unflinching depiction of the world outside our doors, bringing attention to the forces and lives that have continuously shaped the City of Brotherly Love.

Leroy Johnson is the inaugural artist to be selected by Philadelphia Contemporary for the Art at Offsite Philadelphia Spotlight program. Philadelphia Spotlight seeks to highlight local artists by presenting focused, curated selections of their recent work to audiences at Offsite. All works in this exhibition are available for purchase; inquiries can be made at the front desk.

Leroy Johnson, (b. 1937)
Spirit House, 1995.
Mixed media and found objects.

Spirit House depicts a traditional twin house in Eastwick, Southwest Philadelphia, similar to the one in which Johnson grew up. African and Egyptian ancestors and family members atmospherically rise up from the roof as a form of tribute and protection.

Leroy Johnson (b. 1937) has been making art about the urban landscape of Philadelphia for over 50 years, working in mediums ranging from painting to collage and assemblage sculpture. Chronicling the evolving landscape of Philadelphia, his paintings and architectural sculptures offer juxtapositions of social tensions, historical moments, and urban structures in conversation with the lives of African Americans in the city. This selection of recent paintings and sculptures highlights Johnson’s interest in Philadelphia street corners, the interwoven histories of generations, and the most pressing conditions facing contemporary black families, including inadequate access to medical treatment, police brutality and the response of the Black Lives Matter movement, and gentrification. What sets Johnson and his work apart is his unflinching depiction of the world outside our doors, bringing attention to the forces and lives that have continuously shaped the City of Brotherly Love.

Leroy Johnson is the inaugural artist to be selected by Philadelphia Contemporary for the Art at Offsite Philadelphia Spotlight program. Philadelphia Spotlight seeks to highlight local artists by presenting focused, curated selections of their recent work to audiences at Offsite. All works in this exhibition are available for purchase; inquiries can be made at the front desk.

Leroy Johnson, (b. 1937)
Storm Coming, 2012.
Mixed media, collage.

Philadelphia is full of unique architecture that varies by neighborhood. These houses on N 16th street, some of which no longer exist, demonstrate the standard architecture of North Philadelphia homes. In recognition of the active gentrification in the area, the storm rolling in foreshadows the further change to come.

Leroy Johnson (b. 1937) has been making art about the urban landscape of Philadelphia for over 50 years, working in mediums ranging from painting to collage and assemblage sculpture. Chronicling the evolving landscape of Philadelphia, his paintings and architectural sculptures offer juxtapositions of social tensions, historical moments, and urban structures in conversation with the lives of African Americans in the city. This selection of recent paintings and sculptures highlights Johnson’s interest in Philadelphia street corners, the interwoven histories of generations, and the most pressing conditions facing contemporary black families, including inadequate access to medical treatment, police brutality and the response of the Black Lives Matter movement, and gentrification. What sets Johnson and his work apart is his unflinching depiction of the world outside our doors, bringing attention to the forces and lives that have continuously shaped the City of Brotherly Love.

Leroy Johnson is the inaugural artist to be selected by Philadelphia Contemporary for the Art at Offsite Philadelphia Spotlight program. Philadelphia Spotlight seeks to highlight local artists by presenting focused, curated selections of their recent work to audiences at Offsite. All works in this exhibition are available for purchase; inquiries can be made at the front desk.

Leroy Johnson, (b. 1937)
West Side, 2016.
Mixed media and found objects.

West Side is a “flattened out sculpture” displaying the history of the SEPTA MFL line, or the “El”, that runs through West Philadelphia. The composition, inspired by the El transit map, features a collection of photos Johnson took over time while riding along the train line. Transit features prominently in Johnson’s work as a leitmotif of how people move, and wait, in the city.

Leroy Johnson (b. 1937) has been making art about the urban landscape of Philadelphia for over 50 years, working in mediums ranging from painting to collage and assemblage sculpture. Chronicling the evolving landscape of Philadelphia, his paintings and architectural sculptures offer juxtapositions of social tensions, historical moments, and urban structures in conversation with the lives of African Americans in the city. This selection of recent paintings and sculptures highlights Johnson’s interest in Philadelphia street corners, the interwoven histories of generations, and the most pressing conditions facing contemporary black families, including inadequate access to medical treatment, police brutality and the response of the Black Lives Matter movement, and gentrification. What sets Johnson and his work apart is his unflinching depiction of the world outside our doors, bringing attention to the forces and lives that have continuously shaped the City of Brotherly Love.

Leroy Johnson is the inaugural artist to be selected by Philadelphia Contemporary for the Art at Offsite Philadelphia Spotlight program. Philadelphia Spotlight seeks to highlight local artists by presenting focused, curated selections of their recent work to audiences at Offsite. All works in this exhibition are available for purchase; inquiries can be made at the front desk.

Mark Mahosky, (b. 1964  Williamsport, PA)
(left) 68th PA, Peach Orchard, Gettysburg, August 2015.
2015,
Charcoal and acrylic on paper.

(center) Pier, Wrightsville Bridge, November 2016.
2017,
Ink and acrylic on paper.

(right) The Peach Orchard (2nd Version).
2017,
Charcoal and acrylic on paper.

Historical consciousness permeates the art of Mark Mahosky, from engagement with the history of abstraction to drawings of Civil War battlefields, to an ongoing series of small sculptures based loosely on war memorials and Russian Revolution commemorative parades. His interest in history has taken him to maximum security penitentiaries, where he taught humanities courses to inmates, and to Russia, where he engaged students with presentations of American visual culture, as well as the history of the Russian avant-garde. Mahosky’s work employs aspects of Secessionism, Cubism, Constructivism, monumental architecture, and the rough-and-ready sensibility and immediacy of Punk graphic design. Mark Mahosky received his MFA from Stanford University (1988) and his BFA from Tyler School of Art (1986). He is Professor of Painting at Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA. Mahofsky is represented by Fleisher Ollman Gallery.

Alissa McKendrick, (b. Philadelphia, PA)
Untitled, 2019.
Watercolor, flashe, acrylic and oil on canvas.

Alissa McKendrick’s painting series, “Resentment,” centers around female protagonists and impish demons who navigate treacherous surroundings with apparent nonchalance. Her milieu of characters, objects, and environments are all loaded with symbolic weight and meaning. There is a disparity between the sometimes horrific events represented and the laconic reactions of the figures. Like a comedian with expert timing, McKendrick knows when to insert space and pauses. She employs spooky rather than scary, mischievous rather than evil, cute rather than sublime. McKendrick uses these categories, grounded in ambivalent or even explicitly contradictory feelings, to register underlying social value structures and conflicts of inequality. McKendrick received her BFA from Rhode Island School of Design and is represented by Team Gallery.

Eileen Neff
A Planet’s Encouragement 4/7, 2007.
C-print mounted on plexi.

Eileen Neff has been working with photo-based images and installations since 1981. Drawing on both historic and contemporary concepts of picturing the natural and constructed world, her work includes an investigation of studio practice itself as a generative source. From the start, her projects have also developed in relation to the sites where she exhibits, embracing presentation considerations as another critical layer of inquiry.

Neff has been the recipient of many awards, including the John S. Guggenheim Fellowship in Photography, the Pew Fellowship in the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts Grant, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship, and the Leeway Foundation Artist Grant. She has been awarded residencies at Monte Azul Center for the Arts, Talamanca Mountains, Costa Rica; The MacDowell Colony, Peterborough, NH; The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, PA; La Napoule Art Foundation, La Napoule, France; and Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest, Clermont, KY. Neff is a Resident Critic and Seminar Instructor in the MFA Program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She received her BFA in Painting from Philadelphia College of Art and her MFA in Painting from Tyler School of Art. Neff is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery.

Eileen Neff
Birdwatching 5/15, 2012.
C-print mounted on plexi.

Eileen Neff has been working with photo-based images and installations since 1981. Drawing on both historic and contemporary concepts of picturing the natural and constructed world, her work includes an investigation of studio practice itself as a generative source. From the start, her projects have also developed in relation to the sites where she exhibits, embracing presentation considerations as another critical layer of inquiry.

Neff has been the recipient of many awards, including the John S. Guggenheim Fellowship in Photography, the Pew Fellowship in the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts Grant, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship, and the Leeway Foundation Artist Grant. She has been awarded residencies at Monte Azul Center for the Arts, Talamanca Mountains, Costa Rica; The MacDowell Colony, Peterborough, NH; The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, PA; La Napoule Art Foundation, La Napoule, France; and Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest, Clermont, KY. Neff is a Resident Critic and Seminar Instructor in the MFA Program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She received her BFA in Painting from Philadelphia College of Art and her MFA in Painting from Tyler School of Art. Neff is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery.

Eileen Neff
Moon Night 1/7, 2016/2019.
Archival UV pigment on dibond.

Eileen Neff has been working with photo-based images and installations since 1981. Drawing on both historic and contemporary concepts of picturing the natural and constructed world, her work includes an investigation of studio practice itself as a generative source. From the start, her projects have also developed in relation to the sites where she exhibits, embracing presentation considerations as another critical layer of inquiry.

Neff has been the recipient of many awards, including the John S. Guggenheim Fellowship in Photography, the Pew Fellowship in the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts Grant, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship, and the Leeway Foundation Artist Grant. She has been awarded residencies at Monte Azul Center for the Arts, Talamanca Mountains, Costa Rica; The MacDowell Colony, Peterborough, NH; The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, PA; La Napoule Art Foundation, La Napoule, France; and Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest, Clermont, KY. Neff is a Resident Critic and Seminar Instructor in the MFA Program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She received her BFA in Painting from Philadelphia College of Art and her MFA in Painting from Tyler School of Art. Neff is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery.

Eileen Neff
Mountain Road 1/7, 2015/2019.
Archival UV pigment on dibond.

Eileen Neff has been working with photo-based images and installations since 1981. Drawing on both historic and contemporary concepts of picturing the natural and constructed world, her work includes an investigation of studio practice itself as a generative source. From the start, her projects have also developed in relation to the sites where she exhibits, embracing presentation considerations as another critical layer of inquiry.

Neff has been the recipient of many awards, including the John S. Guggenheim Fellowship in Photography, the Pew Fellowship in the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts Grant, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship, and the Leeway Foundation Artist Grant. She has been awarded residencies at Monte Azul Center for the Arts, Talamanca Mountains, Costa Rica; The MacDowell Colony, Peterborough, NH; The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, PA; La Napoule Art Foundation, La Napoule, France; and Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest, Clermont, KY. Neff is a Resident Critic and Seminar Instructor in the MFA Program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She received her BFA in Painting from Philadelphia College of Art and her MFA in Painting from Tyler School of Art. Neff is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery.

Eileen Neff
Night Light 1/7, 2016/2019.
Archival UV pigment on dibond.

Eileen Neff has been working with photo-based images and installations since 1981. Drawing on both historic and contemporary concepts of picturing the natural and constructed world, her work includes an investigation of studio practice itself as a generative source. From the start, her projects have also developed in relation to the sites where she exhibits, embracing presentation considerations as another critical layer of inquiry.

Neff has been the recipient of many awards, including the John S. Guggenheim Fellowship in Photography, the Pew Fellowship in the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts Grant, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship, and the Leeway Foundation Artist Grant. She has been awarded residencies at Monte Azul Center for the Arts, Talamanca Mountains, Costa Rica; The MacDowell Colony, Peterborough, NH; The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, PA; La Napoule Art Foundation, La Napoule, France; and Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest, Clermont, KY. Neff is a Resident Critic and Seminar Instructor in the MFA Program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She received her BFA in Painting from Philadelphia College of Art and her MFA in Painting from Tyler School of Art. Neff is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery.

Eileen Neff
Rendezvous 2/7, 2007.
C-print mounted on plexi.

Eileen Neff has been working with photo-based images and installations since 1981. Drawing on both historic and contemporary concepts of picturing the natural and constructed world, her work includes an investigation of studio practice itself as a generative source. From the start, her projects have also developed in relation to the sites where she exhibits, embracing presentation considerations as another critical layer of inquiry.

Neff has been the recipient of many awards, including the John S. Guggenheim Fellowship in Photography, the Pew Fellowship in the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts Grant, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship, and the Leeway Foundation Artist Grant. She has been awarded residencies at Monte Azul Center for the Arts, Talamanca Mountains, Costa Rica; The MacDowell Colony, Peterborough, NH; The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, PA; La Napoule Art Foundation, La Napoule, France; and Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest, Clermont, KY. Neff is a Resident Critic and Seminar Instructor in the MFA Program at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She received her BFA in Painting from Philadelphia College of Art and her MFA in Painting from Tyler School of Art. Neff is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery.

Dona Nelson, (b. 1947 Grand Isle NE)
Aquetong (Side A), 2019.
Acrylic and painted string on canvas.

In Dona Nelson’s recent works, she combines paint and string using both sides of the canvas. She uses dripping and staining techniques as well as Psychic Automatism to create her abstract works. Her process involves working on one side of the canvas for a while and then switching to the other until eventually the front becomes the front and the back becomes the back. Both sides remain connected as one piece with each side improving the other until they are complete. The difference of the two sides is what interests Nelson: the way in which two very different visual and physical manifestations can be inseparable in form and actively create each other. Nelson received her BFA from Ohio State University and she is a graduate of the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program. She is a professor at the Tyler School of Art and Architecture at Temple University. She has had a number of solo exhibitions including most recently at The Gallery in Paris, France. Nelson is represented by Michael Benevento Gallery.

Dona Nelson, (b. 1947 Grand Isle NE)
Aquetong (Side B), 2019.
Acrylic and painted string on canvas.

In Dona Nelson’s recent works, she combines paint and string using both sides of the canvas. She uses dripping and staining techniques as well as Psychic Automatism to create her abstract works. Her process involves working on one side of the canvas for a while and then switching to the other until eventually the front becomes the front and the back becomes the back. Both sides remain connected as one piece with each side improving the other until they are complete. The difference of the two sides is what interests Nelson: the way in which two very different visual and physical manifestations can be inseparable in form and actively create each other. Nelson received her BFA from Ohio State University and she is a graduate of the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program. She is a professor at the Tyler School of Art and Architecture at Temple University. She has had a number of solo exhibitions including most recently at The Gallery in Paris, France. Nelson is represented by Michael Benevento Gallery.

Romeo Okwara, (b. 1995 Nigeria)
Rescue 2: Before The Call, 2019.
Photography.

Romeo Okwara is a Nigerian-born professional football player for the Detroit Lions who took up photography as a sophomore at Notre Dame. Okwara is self-taught and works in mostly black and white. While playing for the New York Giants, Okwara had the opportunity to visit the New York City Fire Department’s Rescue 2 house, the busiest firehouse in the city. He became so fascinated by the firemen and the culture of the house that he decided to make a body of work telling the story of their daily lives. Okwara spent many days and nights at the firehouse to acquaint himself with the routine and to get to know the men as people. The result is a series of poignant and honest images that are also timely – the Rescue 2 Firehouse is moving to a new home, currently under construction.

Elizabeth Osborne, (b. 1936 Philadelphia)
Approaching Fog, 2004-2017.
Acrylic on canvas.

Elizabeth Osborne makes both figurative and the abstract paintings. Her works are luminous meditations where shadows evoke the passage of time, drawing the audience into the present while acknowledging there is a past and a future. Osborne’s works’ subtle temporality invites their audience to be mindful of the present. In this way, the paintings are alive.

Osborne is a graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts where she was the recipient of several prestigious traveling fellowships, including a Fullbright. She was a professor at PAFA for many years. Osborne has been represented by Locks Gallery since 1972.

Elizabeth Osborne, (b. 1936 Philadelphia)
Studio 2014, 2014.
Oil on canvas.

Elizabeth Osborne makes both figurative and the abstract paintings. Her works are luminous meditations where shadows evoke the passage of time, drawing the audience into the present while acknowledging there is a past and a future. Osborne’s works’ subtle temporality invites their audience to be mindful of the present. In this way, the paintings are alive.

Osborne is a graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts where she was the recipient of several prestigious traveling fellowships, including a Fullbright. She was a professor at PAFA for many years. Osborne has been represented by Locks Gallery since 1972.

Theresa Rose, (b. 1975  Philadelphia, PA)
(left) South 15th Street, 2019. Fine art print (original – collage and drawing on monoprint).

(right) Ridgeway Pool, 2019. Fine art print (original – collage and drawing on monoprint).

Theresa Rose lives and works in her beloved hometown of Philadelphia as an artist, educator and arts organizer. Her passion for the city fuels the content of her studio practice. Rose’s mixed-media works on paper pay tribute to the complex beauty found in the urban environment. From elevating the status of a closed down public school to bringing into relief urban intimacies of sports fanatics and public pools, her watercolor and photo-collage works present a layered depiction of a city very much in transition.

Rose earned her BA in Art Education from Tyler School of Art, Temple University and her MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Her work has been part of exhibitions at Fleisher Art Memorial, Institute of Contemporary Art, The Print Center, Little Berlin, Crane Arts and Seraphin Gallery. Currently, she teaches in the graduate program at Moore College of Art and Design and serves on the Passyunk Square Civic Association Board.

King Saladeen, (b. 1983 Philadelphia, PA)
Muted Color Loud Meaning, 2019.
Acrylic, spray paint, oil pastels, mixed media on canvas.

King Saladeen was born and raised in West Philadelphia. He is a self-taught painter whose works have been exhibited all over the world. He began drawing at the age of 5 and he has been working full time as an artist for the past 8 years. Saladeen’s work functions as a visual language through which the artist expresses love, purpose and hope. Murals by Saladeen are on view at the Philadelphia International Airport and the Fitler Club Field House.

King Saladeen, (b. 1983 Philadelphia, PA)
Muted Color Loud Meaning, 2019.
Acrylic, spray paint, oil pastels, mixed media on canvas.

King Saladeen was born and raised in West Philadelphia. He is a self-taught painter whose works have been exhibited all over the world. He began drawing at the age of 5 and he has been working full time as an artist for the past 8 years. Saladeen’s work functions as a visual language through which the artist expresses love, purpose and hope. Murals by Saladeen are on view at the Philadelphia International Airport and the Fitler Club Field House.

Bill Scott, (b. 1956 Haverford, PA)
A Fainting Sweetness, 2005.
Oil on canvas.

Bill Scott is an abstract painter and printmaker. He is represented by Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York, where he has had eight solo exhibitions. His work has been the subject of additional solo presentations in London, Philadelphia, and San Francisco, and has been included in numerous group shows. His exhibitions have been reviewed in Art in America, ARTnews, the New York Times, and the Philadelphia Inquirer. His works are in a number of public collections, including the Asheville Art Museum, the British Museum, Delaware Art Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Woodmere Art Museum. Since 1999 he has made intaglio prints with the C. R. Ettinger Studio and in 2004 he was awarded a grant from the Independence Foundation in support of his work in color printmaking. He has made commissioned etchings for the Print Club of Cleveland as well as the Print Center and Fleisher Art Memorial in Philadelphia. He has exhibited his prints at Cerulean Arts in Philadelphia. Scott has written on contemporary art for museum and gallery catalogues. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and in 2006 received the institution’s Distinguished Alumni Award.

Scott’s lively use of vibrant color and harmonious compositions blur the line between representation and abstraction, evoking instead an ideal, if not literal, reality. The Fitler Square painting was inspired by time he spent observing the child of a friend playing in Fitler Square. A Fainting Sweetness echoes the buildings and trees he sees from his studio window.

Bill Scott, (b. 1956 Haverford, PA)
Fitler Square, 2007.
Oil on canvas.

Bill Scott is an abstract painter and printmaker. He is represented by Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York, where he has had eight solo exhibitions. His work has been the subject of additional solo presentations in London, Philadelphia, and San Francisco, and has been included in numerous group shows. His exhibitions have been reviewed in Art in America, ARTnews, the New York Times, and the Philadelphia Inquirer. His works are in a number of public collections, including the Asheville Art Museum, the British Museum, Delaware Art Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Woodmere Art Museum. Since 1999 he has made intaglio prints with the C. R. Ettinger Studio and in 2004 he was awarded a grant from the Independence Foundation in support of his work in color printmaking. He has made commissioned etchings for the Print Club of Cleveland as well as the Print Center and Fleisher Art Memorial in Philadelphia. He has exhibited his prints at Cerulean Arts in Philadelphia. Scott has written on contemporary art for museum and gallery catalogues. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and in 2006 received the institution’s Distinguished Alumni Award.

Scott’s lively use of vibrant color and harmonious compositions blur the line between representation and abstraction, evoking instead an ideal, if not literal, reality. The Fitler Square painting was inspired by time he spent observing the child of a friend playing in Fitler Square. A Fainting Sweetness echoes the buildings and trees he sees from his studio window.

Ron Tarver, (b. 1947  Fort Gibson, OK)
(left) The Gathering, 2018. Pigmented ink print.

(center) Hello Darling, 2017. Pigmented ink print.

(right) Running Frank, 2017. Pigmented ink print.

Ron Tarver received a BA in Journalism and Graphic Arts from Northeastern State University in Oklahoma and an MFA from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. He serves as Visiting Assistant Professor of Studio Art specializing in photography at Swarthmore College. Before Swarthmore, Tarver was a photojournalist at the Philadelphia Inquirer for 32 years where he shares a 2012 Pulitzer Prize for his work on a series documenting school violence in the Philadelphia public school system and has been nominated three previous times. His work has appeared in National Geographic, Life, Time, Newsweek, Sports Illustrated, and Black and White Magazine. He is co-author of the book We Were There: Voices of African American Veterans, published by Harper Collins in 2004.

In addition to a successful career in photojournalism, Tarver has distinguished himself in the field of fine art photography. Tarver’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally in over 30 solo and 50 group exhibitions and is included in many private, corporate, and museum collections including the Philadelphia Museum of Art. His current work involves the appropriation of photographs his father, Richard Tarver, produced in the 1940s and 50s to construct contemporary images that comment on the pervasive legacy of racial strife in the United States. The more than 300 photographs and over 1000 black and white negatives Richard Tarver produced of the African American residents in the small Oklahoma town of Fort Gibson reflect a time when Jim Crow laws were still in place. While those laws have since been abolished, their legacy lives on. These reimagined images tie together a troublesome past with an equally troublesome present.

Shawn Theodore, (b. 1970, Stuttgart)
(left) Graceful in West Philly, 2015. Digital photograph printed on archival paper.

(right) Train, Fight, Win, Repeat 2016. Digital photograph printed on archival paper.

Shawn Theodore is an interdisciplinary artist who incorporates photography, collage and sculpture to create afromythological environments, photographs and objects. Theodore’s striking portraiture merges real or hypothesized black experiences, often set within environments under threat of disappearance. His work explores the contradictions and nuances involved with constructing representations of blackness. Theodore received his BA in Journalism, Public Relations and Advertising from Temple University. He is currently enrolled at Savannah College of Art and Design for his MFA in Photography. He is a professor at the University of the Arts.

Shawn Theodore, (b. 1970, Stuttgart)
(left) Prayers to Hushed Saints, 2017. Digital photograph printed on archival paper.

(right) Being Black is Lit, 2017. Digital photograph printed on archival paper.

Shawn Theodore is an interdisciplinary artist who incorporates photography, collage and sculpture to create afromythological environments, photographs and objects. Theodore’s striking portraiture merges real or hypothesized black experiences, often set within environments under threat of disappearance. His work explores the contradictions and nuances involved with constructing representations of blackness. Theodore received his BA in Journalism, Public Relations and Advertising from Temple University. He is currently enrolled at Savannah College of Art and Design for his MFA in Photography. He is a professor at the University of the Arts.

Wilmer Wilson IV, (b. 1989  Richmond, VA)
End, 2018.
Staples and pigment print on wood.

Wilmer Wilson IV is known for his performative investigations into the marginalization of, and the care for, black bodies in everyday social relation. He also creates works using a variety of mixed media. For his staple pieces, he uses large-scale photographic prints, often fliers he finds in his West Philadelphia neighborhood, and he blows them up to life size and applies them to a plywood substrate. Then, he obscures the image with thousands of staples. Wilson’s art prompts us to question the representation, or misrepresentation, of black culture in society. He earned his BFA from Howard University and his MFA from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the recipient of The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage Fellowship and The American Academy in Rome Fellowship. Wilson is represented by Susan Inglett Gallery.

Wilmer Wilson IV, (b. 1989  Richmond, VA)
Seasons, 2015.
Staples, pigment print, acrylic on wood.

Wilmer Wilson IV is known for his performative investigations into the marginalization of, and the care for, black bodies in everyday social relation. He also creates works using a variety of mixed media. For his staple pieces, he uses large-scale photographic prints, often fliers he finds in his West Philadelphia neighborhood, and he blows them up to life size and applies them to a plywood substrate. Then, he obscures the image with thousands of staples. Wilson’s art prompts us to question the representation, or misrepresentation, of black culture in society. He earned his BFA from Howard University and his MFA from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the recipient of The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage Fellowship and The American Academy in Rome Fellowship. Wilson is represented by Susan Inglett Gallery.

Jen Wink Hays, (b. 1972  Bath, ME)
Blowback, 2019.
Oil on linen.

Jen Wink Hays is a contemporary American painter and sculptor. Born in Bath, Maine, Hays studied studio art and painting at Barnard College in New York City. While in New York, Hays co-founded Manhattan’s influential Blue School as well as the award-winning design studio, Utility Design. In 2012, Hays turned full-time to her fine art practice and has since shown her work in numerous solo and group exhibitions including “Almanac” in 2016, “Vacationland” in 2017 and “Playing Field” at Sears Peyton Gallery in 2018.
Blowback is the first of a series four of large-scale abstract oil paintings characterized by odd organic shapes in corals, bubblegum pinks, and jungle greens that congregate and slide past each other. Brighter, lighter, floaty bits break away from a pile of slumped, conjoined forms suggesting an unseen force disrupting the scene. Hayes built this series of works by painting around and over previous layers, an inverted process that required building a foundation and then selectively obscuring it. The result is both peaceful and chaotic, like a snapshot of a moment of disruption.

Wink Hays lives in Philadelphia with her husband and three children.

Jen Wink Hays, (b. 1972  Bath, ME)
Blowback, 2019.
Oil on linen.

Jen Wink Hays is a contemporary American painter and sculptor. Born in Bath, Maine, Hays studied studio art and painting at Barnard College in New York City. While in New York, Hays co-founded Manhattan’s influential Blue School as well as the award-winning design studio, Utility Design. In 2012, Hays turned full-time to her fine art practice and has since shown her work in numerous solo and group exhibitions including “Almanac” in 2016, “Vacationland” in 2017 and “Playing Field” at Sears Peyton Gallery in 2018.
Blowback is the first of a series four of large-scale abstract oil paintings characterized by odd organic shapes in corals, bubblegum pinks, and jungle greens that congregate and slide past each other. Brighter, lighter, floaty bits break away from a pile of slumped, conjoined forms suggesting an unseen force disrupting the scene. Hayes built this series of works by painting around and over previous layers, an inverted process that required building a foundation and then selectively obscuring it. The result is both peaceful and chaotic, like a snapshot of a moment of disruption.

Wink Hays lives in Philadelphia with her husband and three children.


Door